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2601 Wiston House -
1871 England Census:- Clerk in Holy Orders J.P. for Sussex.
Landowner and occupier of 900 acres farming land.
Employer of 20 men and 6 boys besides 1500 acres of woodlands. 
Goring, Reverend John (I3874)
 
2602 with Papal dispensation for both consanguinity and affinity Family F5590
 
2603 Without Royal consent Family F4942
 
2604 Witnesses: Eliza Selina Le Keux Louisa Le Keux Family F366
 
2605 Wladislaw I, King of Poland was a member of the House of Piast.
He was a member of the House of Wladislaw 'the Short'.
He succeeded to the title of Duke of Cracow in 1306.
He was created King Wladislaw I of Poland in 1320. 
Wladislaw I King of Poland (I8882)
 
2606 World War I Victoria Cross Medal Recipient. He served as a Lieutenant Colonel Commander of the 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards. On September 15, 1916, at Ginchy, France, Lieutenant Colonel Campbell personally led an attack against the German machine guns, capturing the guns and killing the personnel. Later in the day, he again rallied his battalion through a very hostile fire against the objective and was the first to enter the enemy trench. For most conspicuous bravery, he was awarded the Victoria Cross Medal in October 1916 and later achieved the rank of Brigadier General. Campbell, John Vaughan V.C. C.M.G D.S.O (I16519)
 
2607 Wounds received in action Villiers, William 2nd Viscount Grandison of Limerick (I19941)
 
2608 Wriothesley Russell 2nd Duke of Bedford was styled as Marquess of Tavistock between 1694 and 1700.
He matriculated at Magdalen College Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire England on 13 May 1696.
He succeeded to the title of 6th Earl of Bedford [E. 1550] on 7 September 1700.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Duke of Bedford [E. 1694] on 7 September 1700.
He succeeded to the title of 7th Baron Russell [E. 1539] on 7 September 1700.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Marquess of Tavistock [E. 1694] on 7 September 1700.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Howland of Streatham Surrey [E. 1695] on 7 September 1700. He succeeded to the title of 4th Baron Russell of Thornhaugh co. Northampton [E. 1603] on 7 September 1700.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire between 1701 and 1711.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Bedfordshire between 1701 and 1711.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Middlesex between 1701 and 1711.
He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber from 1701 to 1702.
He was invested as a Knight Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 14 March 1701/2 
Russell, Wriothesley 2nd Duke of Bedford (I15849)
 
2609  Brigadier Arthur Herbert Montgomery was educated at Wellington College Wellington Berkshire England.
He was educated at Hertford College Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire England.
He fought in the Second World War.
He gained the rank of Brigadier in the service of the Royal Artillery (Territorial Army).
He was invested as a Officer Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1945.
He was decorated with the award of Territorial Decoration (T.D.).
He was invested as a Fellow Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (F.I.C.A.). 
Montgomery, Brigadier Arthur Herbert (I18940)
 
2610  Brigadier Ernest John Montgomery was educated at Rugby School Rugby Warwickshire England.
He was educated at Royal Military College Sandhurst Berkshire England.
He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Argyllshire.
He fought in the Second World War where he was mentioned in despatches twice.
He was invested as a Member Order of the British Empire (M.B.E.) in 1940.
He was invested as a Officer Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1945.
He was admitted to Royal Company of Archers.
He was invested as a Commander Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) in 1950.
He gained the rank of Brigadier in the service of the Highland Light Infantry.
He fought in the Malayan Campaign between 1951 and 1954.
He was Companion Order of the Bath (C.B.) in 1953. 
Montgomery, Brigadier Ernest John (I18939)
 
2611  Charles Boyle 4th Earl of Orrery was educated at St. Paul's School London England.
He matriculated at Christ Church College Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire England on 5 June 1690.
He graduated from Christ Church College Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire England in 1694 with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Charleville [Ireland] between 1695 and 1699.
He was Receiver General in the Alienation Office on 18 October 1699.
George Graham named his invention after the Earl the astronomical instrument or 'orrery.'
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Huntingdon Borough between 1701 and 1705.
He succeeded to the title of 4th Lord Boyle Baron of Broghill [I. 1628] on 24 August 1703.
He succeeded to the title of 4th Earl of Orrery [I. 1660] on 24 August 1703.
He was Colonel of the Regiment of Foot between 1704 and 1710.
He was invested as a Knight Order of the Thistle (K.T.) on 30 October 1705.
He was invested as a Fellow Royal Society (F.R.S.) on 3 April 1706.
He fought in the Battle of Malplaquet in 1709.
He gained the rank of Brigadier-General on 1 January 1708/9.
He gained the rank of Major-General on 17 August 1710.
He was Colonel of the North British Fusiliers (21st Foot) between 8 December 1710 and July 1716.
He held the office of Envoy Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Flanders in January 1710/11 where he took part in the Treaty of Utrecht.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 9 February 1710/11.
He was created 1st Baron Boyle of Marston co. Somerset [Great Britain] on 5 September 1711.
He was a Lord of the Bedchamber between 1714 and 1716.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Somerset from 1714 to 1715.
From 28 September 1722 to 14 March 1722/23 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London on suspicion of being involved in the Layer's plot however was was discharged. 
Boyle, Charles 4th Earl of Orrery (I16734)
 
2612  David Carnegie 1st Earl of Southesk was invested as a Knight in 1603.
He was created 1st Lord Carnegie of Kinnaird [Scotland] on 14 April 1616.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Scotland] in January 1616/17.
He was Temporary President of the Scottish Council between April 1625 and May 1625.
He held the office of Lord of Session from February 1625/26 to 1628.
He was created 1st Lord Carnegie of Kinnaird and Leuchars [Scotland] on 22 June 1633 with a special remainder to his heirs male for ever.
He was created 1st Earl of Southesk [Scotland] on 22 June 1633.
He held the office of Sheriff of Forfarshire in 1646. 
Carnegie, Sir David 1st Earl of Southesk (I13239)
 
2613  He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) of County Galway.
He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for County Galway.
He held the office of High Sheriff of County Galway in 1836.
He lived at Killyan, County Galway, Ireland. 
Chevers, John (I30497)
 
2614  In 1789 he suceeded to the Cromarty estates on the death of his cousin Lord MacLeod. Mackenzie, Kenneth (I19381)
 
2615  John Hamilton of Udston lived at Udston Scotland.
He fought in the Battle of Langside on 13 May 1568 fighting for Mary Queen of Scots. 
Hamilton, John of Udston (I18343)
 
2616  Josef Anton Joseph Baptist Erzherzog von Österreich was a member of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. He gained the title of Erzherzog von Österreich (styled as HI&RH Archduke of Austria).
He was Governor and Captain-General of Hungary in 1795.
He gained the title of Palatine of Hungary in 1796.
He gained the rank of General Field Marshal in the service of the Austrian Army. 
von Österreich, Josef Anton Joseph Baptist Erzherzog (I17656)
 
2617  Maj.-Gen. Robert Walter Stuart 11th Lord Blantyre gained the title of 11th Lord Blantyre [S. 1606] on 5 November 1783.
He was educated at Eton College Eton Berkshire England.
He gained the rank of Ensign in 1795 in the service of the 3rd Foot Guards.
He fought in the campaign in Holland in 1799.
He gained the rank of Captain in the service of the 31st Foot.
He gained the rank of Captain in the service of the 7th Dragoons.
He fought in the Egyptian War in 1801.
He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the service of the 42nd Foot.
He held the office of Representative Peer [Scotland] between 1806 and 1807.
He fought in the Peninsular Wars in 1809.
He was invested as a Companion Order of the Bath (C.B.) on 4 June 1815.
He gained the rank of Major-General in 1819.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Renfrewshire between 1820 and 1822. 
Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Robert Walter 11th Lord Blantyre (I18420)
 
2618  On 20 May 1441 he was granted Raploch Lanarkshire by his cousin SIr James Hamilton 6th of Cadzow.
He lived at Raploch Lanarkshire Scotland. 
Hamilton, James of Raploch (I18337)
 
2619  Reverend George Talbot was the Vicar at Guiting Gloucestershire England. Talbot, Reverend George (I16320)
 
2620  Rt. Hon. Henry Bilson-Legge was baptised with the name of Henry Legge.
He held the office of Chancellor of the Exchequer.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.). 
Bilson-Legge, Rt. Hon. Henry (I19024)
 
2621  Rt. Hon. Sir Frank Cavendish Lascelles was with the Diplomatic Service between 1861 and 1908.
He was Agent and Consul-General to Bulgaria between 1879 and 1886.
He held the office of Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Romania between 1887 and 1891.
He held the office of Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Persia between 1891 and 1894.
He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross Order of St. Michael and St. George (G.C.M.G.) in 1892.
He held the office of Ambassador to Russia between 1894 and 1895.
He held the office of Ambassador to Germany between 1895 and 1908.
He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) in 1897.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.).
He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross Royal Victorian Order (G.C.V.O.) in 1904. 
Lascelles, Rt. Hon. Frank Cavendish G.C.B. G.C.M.G. G.C.V.O. P.C. (I17317)
 
2622  Thomas Burgh was also known as Thomas Borough.
Lord of the Manor of Gainsborough Lincolnshire acquired though his wife. 
Burgh, Thomas (I10436)
 
2623  William George Richard Stanley 9th Earl of Derby held the office of Sovereign Lord of the Isle of Man.
He succeeded to the title of 3rd Lord Strange [E. 1628] on 21 December 1672.
He succeeded to the title of 9th Earl of Derby [E. 1485] on 21 December 1672.
He held the office of Vice-Admiral of Lancashire and Cheshire between 1673 and 1702.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Cheshire between 1676 and 1689.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Lancashire between 1676 and 1689.
He held the office of Chamberlain of Chester between 1677 and 1702.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of North Wales in 1702 except Denbighshire.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Lancashire between June 1702 and November 1702.
On his death the Barony of Strange fell into abeyance between daughters. 
Stanley, William George Richard 9th Earl of Derby (I19473)
 
2624   Alexander William Crawford Lindsay 25th Earl of Crawford was educated between 1824 and 1828 at Eton College Eton Berkshire England.
He graduated from Trinity College Cambridge University Cambridge Cambridgeshire England in 1833 with a Master of Arts (M.A.).
He succeeded to the title of 9th Lord Lindsay of Balcarres [S. 1633] on 15 December 1869.
He succeeded to the title of 8th Lord Lindsay and Balneil [S. 1651] on 15 December 1869.
He succeeded to the title of 25th Earl of Crawford [S. 1398] on 15 December 1869.
He succeeded to the title of 8th Earl of Balcarres [S. 1651] on 15 December 1869.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Wigan of Haigh Hall co. Lancaster [U.K. 1826] on 15 December 1869.
He wrote the book The History of Christian Art.
He wrote the book The Lives of the Lindsays. 
Lindsay, Alexander William Crawford 25th Earl of Crawford (I15577)
 
2625   George Cholmondeley 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Whig) for East Looe between 1724 and 1727.
He was styled as Viscount Malpas between 1725 and 1733.
He held the office of Governor of Chester between 1725 and 1770.
He was invested as a Knight Order of the Bath (K.B.) on 27 May 1725.
He held the office of Master of the Robes from 1726 to 1727.
He held the office of Lord of the Admiralty between 1727 and 1729.
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Whig) for Windsor between 1727 and 1733.
He held the office of Master of the Horse to the Prince of Wales between 1728 and 1735.
He held the office of Vice-Admiral of Cheshire between 1733 and 1770.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Cheshire between 1733 and 1770.
He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baron Cholmondeley of Witch Malbank alias Nantwich co. Chester [E. 1689] on 7 May 1733.
He succeeded to the title of 3rd Viscount Malpas co. Chester [E. 1706] on 7 May 1733.
He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley co. Chester [E. 1706] on 7 May 1733.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Newburgh in the Isle of Anglesey [G.B. 1716] on 7 May 1733.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Newborough of Newborough co. Wexford [I. 1715] on 7 May 1733.
He succeeded to the title of 4th Viscount Cholmondeley of Kells co. Meath [I. 1661] on 7 May 1733.
He held the office of Lord of the Treasury from 1735 to 1736.
He held the office of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster between 1736 and 1743.
He held the office of Chamberlain of Cheshire between 1 March 1735/36 and 1770.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 21 May 1736.
He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Montgomeryshire between 1737 and 1761.
He held the office of Lord Privy Seal between December 1743 and December 1744.
He held the office of Joint Vice-Treasurer [Ireland] between 1744 and 1757.
He gained the rank of Colonel in the Army in 1745.
He gained the rank of Major-General in 1755.
He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General in 1759. 
Cholmondeley, George 3rd Earl of Cholmondeley (I19419)
 
2626   Henri Eugène Philippe Louis d'Orléans Duc d'Aumâle gained the title of Duc d'Aumâle.
He gained the rank of Inspector-General in 1879 in the service of the French Army.
He was invested as a Knight Order of the Golden Fleece of Spain.
In 1886 he was exiled from France.
He was admitted to French Academy.
He wrote the book History of the Princes of Condé. 
d’ Orléans, Henri Eugène Philippe Louis Duc d’Aumâle (I17689)
 
2627    Ashburnham John 1603-1671 royalist was the eldest son of Sir John Ashburnham by Elizabeth daughter of Sir Thomas Beaumont. Sir John died in 1620 having wasted his estate and leaving his family in penury. But within two years his heir had so far repaired their broken fortune that (says the epitaph in Ashburnham church Sussex) there were none of them but were in a condition rather to be helpful to others than to want support themselves.
     Elizabeth Beaumont was of the same family as Lady Villiers mother of the Duke of Buckingham and under Buckingham's patronage began the court career of John Ashburnham. In 1627 he was already known to the king who styled him Jack Ashburnham in his letters to the duke. In 1628 he was elected M.P. for Hastings. The murder of Buckingham in that year did not injure his fortunes; he was in November sworn into the place of groom of the bedchamber. The Calendars of State Papers contain ample evidence that he and his friend the secretary Nicholas omitted few of the many opportunities given them by their position at court to enrich themselves by money-lending or by the purchase of land at easy rates. In 1638 the Star-chamber fine of two thousand marks inflicted on Sir Walter Long and his brother was assigned to Ashburnham in satisfaction of so much due from his majesty to him and in December of the next year a warrant under the privy seal enabled him to regain his ancestral estate of Ashburnham which had become a ruinous burden to its actual possessors. If the dates assigned in the printed calendars be correct Ashburnham had not obtained the favour of this warrant until six years after his petition for it. His friends Nicholas and Goring were very careful of his interest (as he himself acknowledges) in promoting his appointment as provided to the army then in preparation for Scotland (January 1640). Their success prevented his election for Hastings when the commons were summoned in April only to be dissolved in May; but he was returned for that place in November when the failure of the war the necessities of the king and the exasperation of the people had rendered inevitable the meeting of another—the Long—parliament. No speech of his is recorded but his name frequently occurs as on committees or as a teller on divisions during the earlier sessions of that assembly. As time went on his two functions of member of parliament and servant of the king became incompatible and when his attendance on his master prevented his obeying the summons of the house he was proceeded against for contempt (6 May 1642). The king wrote a letter to the commons in his justification but the house maintained its prior right to the obedience of its member. Ashburnham was discharged and disabled (5 Feb. 1643-4) his estate was sequestrated (14 Sept.) and his wife's petition for some allowance for his children was rejected. He became the treasurer and paymaster of the king's army. For the next three years his name occurs in several negotiations for peace. He was one of the commissioners at Uxbridge (1644) and one of the four appointed to lay the king's proposals before parliament (December 1645). When Fairfax prepared to besiege Oxford and Charles determined upon flight Ashburnham and Dr. Hudson were the sole attendants of the king in the perilous journey to the Scotch camp. Hudson was released and his troubled life was ended by his barbarous murder (6 June 1648). Ashburnham was positively commanded by the king to fly before confirmation of the order to send him up to London as a delinquent could be received. He got safely to Holland and thence to the queen at Paris. In 1647 the king's fortune seemed upon the turn. The army had taken possession of him at Holmby had treated him with respect and allowed him to have what servants about him he pleased. Ashburnham resumed his attendance on his master at Hampton Court. But the army leaders changed their tone. Charles was haunted by the dread of assassination. He was constantly receiving warnings anonymous and avowed that his murder was resolved upon. At Ashburnham's suggestion he made proposals to the Scotch commissioners for his sudden journey to London and personal treaty with the parliament. But the arrangement fell through the commissioners dreading the responsibility. Charles resolved to stay no longer in Hampton Court and impatient to be gone commanded Ashburnham and his other confidants Sir John Berkeley and Legge to propose some place for him to go to. Ashburnham mentioned Sir John Oglander's house in the Isle of Wight as a place where the king might be concealed till the disposition of the governor of the island Colonel Robert Hammond could be ascertained. If Hammond were not to be trusted the fugitive could secretly take ship for France. There was nothing impracticable in the plan but its success depended upon keeping the royal whereabout from the knowledge of Hammond until the governor had fully engaged himself to respect the king's liberty of action. This particular was neglected and the secret divulged by Berkeley. The governor having given assurances of loyalty was taken to the house wherein Charles was awaiting the result of the interview. When informed of his approach the king exclaimed O Jack thou hast undone me! The foreboding was true. Refusing the desperate offer of Ashburnham to make all safe by killing Hammond Charles again became virtually a prisoner.
     His share in this transaction exposed Ashburnham to the suspicions of the royalists and his explanation printed in 1648 was of necessity so guarded as to be ineffective. A full narrative drawn up by him and shown to many of his contemporaries—Clarendon among the rest—remained unpublished until 1830 when his descendant Lord Ashburnham printed it with full elucidation and accompanied it with a complete caustic commentary on all the passages wherein Clarendon has made mention of the writer. The reputation of Ashburnham is cleared and the treachery and malevolence of the noble historian are exposed with unsparing severity. Ashburnham was parted from his master by order of the parliament 1 Jan. 1648 was imprisoned in Windsor Castle (May) and when the second civil war broke out was exchanged for Sir William Masham. He was not allowed to attend the king during the treaty at Newport (August) and was included among the delinquents who were to expect no pardon (13 Oct.). His position after the king's death was unenviable. He had acquired an estate by his second marriage with the Dowager Lady Poulett (1649) and Charles II gave him permission to stay in England to preserve it. The loyal party suspected his fidelity and (March 1650) in a memorial to the king asked whether they might trust him. He was harassed by the victors. He was sued for debts contracted for the late king. He was forced to compound for one half of his estate an unparalleled severity. He was bound in heavy securities to appear when required before the council of state. His private journeys were licensed by a pass from the same authority. For three years he was so persecuted by committees to discover who had lent the king money during the wars that I had scarce time to eat my bread. Five years more he continues were spent in close imprisonment at London and three banishments to Guernsey Castle the cause being for sending money to his majesty. In a list of the Tower prisoners furnished by Colonel Barkstead (2 June 1654) John Ashburnham appears as prisoner for high treason; but this is probably a slip for William who was at that time in custody for complicity in the plot of Gerard and Vowel. John's case was (27 Dec. 1655) referred to the major-generals of the counties where his estate lay. At the Restoration Ashburnham came back to his old place of groom of the bedchamber. Of his zeal therein Pepys makes a half-pathetic record (2 Sept. 1667) recalling Shakespeare's Adam and the goodly service of the antique world. The same authority elsewhere mentions him as a pleasant man one who hath seen much of the world and more of the court. Of the Hampton Court business Pepys notes that after solemnly charging each other with its failure and being publicly at daggers drawn about it Ashburnham Berkeley and Legge are now the best friends in the world. Besides his place Ashburnham received what acknowledgment of his loyalty the royal treasury impoverished by many claimants could afford. He was (September 1661) the head of a commission to inquire into the abuses in the post office. His house at Chiswick with its contents was purchased by the king for the Duke of Monmouth of whom (January 1665) he was made one of the guardians. His loans to Charles I were paid by grants of crown leases but his schemes for the acquisition of land do not appear to have run so smoothly as in the former reign. The dean and chapter of Exeter are menaced (November 1662) with the royal displeasure if they carry out their projected lease to John Ashburnham or to any other. He was M.P. for Sussex from 1661 till his expulsion in 1667 for taking a bribe of 500l. from French merchants. He and his brother William shared in an enterprise for reviving the manufacture of tapestry at Mortlake (1667). Ashburnham died in 1671. His grandson was raised to the peerage in 1689. His portrait by Mytens has been engraved as a frontispiece to his Narrative quoted above.

Sources:
     Narrative edited by Lord Ashburnham 1830
     Cal. State Papers Dom.

Contributor: R. C. B. [Richard Charles Browne]

Published: 1885
  
Ashburnham, John (I16665)
 
2628    Edward George Villiers Stanley 17th Earl of Derby was educated at Wellington College Berkshire England.
He gained the rank of Lieutenant in 1885 in the service of the Grenadier Guards.
He was Aide-de-Camp to the Governor-General of Canada between 1888 and 1891.
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Conservative) for West Houghton between 1892 and 1906.
He held the office of a Lord of Treasury between 1895 and 1900.
He fought in the Boer War between 1899 and 1900.
He was Private Secretary to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa in 1900.
He was invested as a Companion Order of the Bath (C.B.) in 1900.
He held the office of Finance Secretary of the War Office between 1900 and 1903.
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1903.
He held the office of Postmaster-General between 1903 and 1905.
He was invested as a Knight Commander Royal Victorian Order (K.C.V.O.) in 1905.
He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross Royal Victorian Order (G.C.V.O.) in 1908.
He succeeded to the title of 11th Baronet Stanley of Bickerstaffe co. Lancs [E. 1627] on 14 July 1908.
He succeeded to the title of 17th Earl of Derby [E. 1485] on 14 July 1908.
He succeeded to the title of 4th Baron Stanley of Bickerstaffe co. Lancaster [U.K. 1832] on 14 July 1908.
He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baron Stanley of Preston co. Lancaster [U.K. 1886] on 14 July 1908.
He held the office of Chancellor of Liverpool University in 1909.
He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Law (LL.D.) by Liverpool University Liverpool Lancashire England.
He held the office of Lord Mayor of Liverpool between 1911 and 1912.
He was invested as a Knight Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1915.
He was Director-General of Recruiting between 1915 and 1916.
He held the office of Under-Secretary for War between 1915 and 1916.
He was Vice-President of the Army Council in 1916.
He held the office of Secretary of State for War between 1916 and 1918.
He held the office of President of the Army Council between 1916 and 1918.
He was decorated with the award of Grand Cordon Legion of Honour.
He held the office of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoteniary to France between 1918 and 1920.
He was decorated with the award of Order of Charles XII of Spain.
He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.).
He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) in 1920.
He held the office of President of the Army Council in 1922.3 He held the office of Secretary of State for War between 1922 and 1924.3 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Lancashire in 1928.
He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Law (LL.D.) by Birmingham University Birmingham Warwickshire England in 1934.
He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) by Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire England in 1934.
He was decorated with the award of Royal Victorian Chain in 1935.
He gained the rank of Honorary Colonel in the service of the 5th Battalion The King's (Liverpool Regiment).
He gained the rank of Honorary Colonel in the service of the 4th and 5th Battalions Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.
He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Law (LL.D.) by Cambridge University Cambridge Cambridgeshire England in 1935.
He gained the rank of Honorary Colonel in the service of the 4th Battalion Manchester Regiment.
He was invested as a Knight of Grace Order of St. John of Jerusalem (K.G.St.J.). 
Stanley, Edward George Villiers 17th Earl of Derby (I17402)
 
2629 § Stapleton, Maria Frances Catherine (I16598)
 
2630 Ælfræd King of Wessex also went by the nick-name of Alfred 'the Great' (?).
He succeeded to the title of King Ælfræd of Wessex on 23 April 871.
He succeeded to the title of King Ælfræd of Mercia on 23 April 871.
He helped his brother gain a great victory over the Danes at Ashdown in 871. Alfred organised the army and was the founder of the English Navy. By 877 the Danes had occupied London and reached Gloucester and Exeter but they lost 120 supply ships in a fierce storm off Swanage. In 878 he was forced to hide in Somerset and it was there arose the legend of the burned cakes. He renewed the fight and won a famous victory at Edington in Wiltshire the same year. After the Danes agreed that their king Guthrum should be baptised and Alfred was godfather. Afterwards Guthrum ruled Mercia but acknowledged Alfred as Overlord. The Mercian settlement developed over the next 100 years into the body known as Danelaw. Before that in 879 at Fulham and also near Rochester in 884 other Norse armies landed. Alfred continued fighting until he was the acknowledged champion of the English against the Danes. Alfred was scholarly a writer law-maker pious and also a valiant fighter. Additionally he had a good knowledge of geography. He was a most able administrator and also instituted educational programmes. He founded monasteries and gave a large part of his income to charities. 
Ælfræd King of Wessex (I9580)
 
2631 Ælfthryth (?) was also known as Alstrita (?).
She was also known as Elstrudis (?).
From 11 May 973 her married name became Queen Elfrida of England.
She was a nun circa 986 at Wherwell Abbey Hampshire England. 
Ælfthryth (I9606)
 
2632 Ælfthryth Princess of Wessex was also known as Ælftrud Ælfthryth Princess of Wessex (I9535)
 
2633 Æthelred II 'the Unready' King of England succeeded to the title of King Æthelred II of England on 18 March 978.
He was crowned King of England on 4 April 978 at Kingston-upon-Thames London England.
He abdicated as King of England in 1013.
He succeeded to the title of King Æthelred II of England on 3 February 1014.
Ethelred was the son of King Edgar and began to reign when only 11 years old. He was a weakling totally unable to withstand the Danish onslaught that re-started on his accession. He continually attempted to buy off the Danes - Danegeld - as when he lost the Battle of Maldon in 991. In a state of near panic he ordered the slaughter of all Danes whether peaceful settlers or not and this foul deed was put in hand on St. Brices Day 13 Nov 1002. Among the victims was the sister of Sweyn King of Denmark. The Norsemen were furious and ravaged the country from Cornwall to Kent and from South Wales to East Anglia. By 1013 Sweyn who was accompanied by his son Canute was proclaimed King but he died soon afterwards. Ethelred fled to Normandy when Sweyn's rule prevailed and then on Sweyn's death he returned but the English lords placed severe restrictions on him. The Danes led by Canute returned in 1015 and landing at Poole they crossed the Thames at Cricklade. 
Æthelred II 'the Unready' King of England (I7470)
 
2634 Æðelbeorht I King of Kent succeeded to the title of King Æðelbeorht I of Kent in 560. Æðelbeorht I King of Kent (I10918)
 
2635 Æðelbeorht II King of Kent succeeded to the title of King Æðelbeorht II of Kent in 725. Æðelbeorht II King of Kent (I10899)
 
2636 Æðelwulf King of Wessex gained the title of Subregulus of Kent Essex Sussex and Surrey between 825 and 828.
He succeeded to the title of King Æðelwulf of Wessex on 4 February 839.
He was crowned King of Wessex in 839 at Kingston-upon-Thames London England.
He abdicated as King of Wessex between 855 and 856.
Ethelwulf was the son of King Egbert and had previously ruled Kent and adjoining minor kingdoms. He continued wars against the Danes and had a victory at the mouth of the Parret in Somerset in 845 and again in 851 when he beat a force of 350 ships' companies who attacked Canterbury. Ethelwulf helped the Mercians against the Welsh and then married the Mercian king's daughter. He was a religious man and in 855 undertook a pilgrimage to Rome leaving the country in charge of Ethelbald his eldest son. On his return to avoid civil war he allowed Ethelbald to retain Wessex while he ruled Kent and other parts of south eastern England. 
Æðelwulf King of Wessex (I9615)
 
2637 ‘Black Jaundice’ or Wiels Disease Campbell, Archibald 1st Duke of Argyll (I13466)
 
2638 ‘put to death’ de Courtenay, Pierre Emperor of Constantinople (I12442)
 

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