Adalulf Count of Boulogne

Male 890 - 933  (43 years)


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  • Name , Adalulf 
    Suffix Count of Boulogne 
    Born 890  Boulogne France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 13 Nov 933  Therouanne Artois Pas-de-Calais France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10770  GrangerMusgrave
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2016 

    Father Baldwin II Comte de Flandre,   b. 863,   d. 10 Sep 918, Blandinberg Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Mother Ælfthryth Princess of Wessex,   b. 872, Wessex England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jun 929, Flanders Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Married 884 
    Family ID F6674  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family de Crequy, Mahaut,   b. 895, Crequy Montreuil Artois Pas-de-Calais France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Arnulf II Comte de Boulogne,   b. 922, Boulogne-sur-Mer Artois Pas-de-Calais France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 971  (Age 49 years)
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2016 10:52:12 
    Family ID F7495  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Coats of Arms
    Adalulf Count of Boulogne
    Adalulf Count of Boulogne

  • Notes 
    • He was a son of Baldwin II, Count of Flanders, and of Ælfthryth.[1] He was probably named for his maternal great-grandfather, King Æthelwulf of Wessex.[2] Baldwin II's extensive lands and many offices in what is now the north of modern France and the west of Belgium were divided among his sons on his death in 918.[3] The elder, Arnulf, became Count of Flanders while Adelolf succeeded his father as count of Saint-Pol, Count of Boulogne and of Thérouanne.[3] He was also the lay abbot of the Abbey of Saint Bertinus (Saint-Bertin) at Saint-Omer.[4]

      In 926 Adelolf was sent as an ambassador to his maternal first cousin King Æthelstan of England by Count Hugh the Great,[5] effective ruler of northern France under Rudolph, Duke of Burgundy, who had been elected king of France in 923. Adelolf was to seek the English king's agreement to a marriage between Hugh and another of Æthelstan's sisters.[6] Among the lavish gifts sent to Æthelstan, an avid collector of relics, were said to be the sword of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and the Holy Lance. The embassy was a success and Hugh was married to Æthelstan's half-sister Eadhild.[7]

      Adelolf was the father of Arnulf II, Count of Boulogne (died 971), and of an illegitimate son named Baldwin (died 973) who was guardian of Arnulf II, Count of Flanders.[4]

      According to Folcwine's Gesta abbatum Sancti Bertini Sithiensium (Deeds of the abbots of Saint-Bertin), Adelolf died on 13 November 933. He was buried at Saint-Bertin.[8]
      References
      1.^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 5
      2.^ Philip Grierson (1941), "The Relations between England and Flanders before the Norman Conquest", Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Fourth Series, 23, 86; Le Jan; Vanderkindere.
      3.^ a b Renée Nip, 'The Political Relations between England and Flanders (1066-1128)', Anglo-Norman Studies 21: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1998, ed. Christopher Harper-Bill (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, UK, 1999), p. 150
      4.^ a b Le Jan; Vanderkindere.
      5.^ Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 15, Ed. Peter Clemoes, Simon Keynes, Michael Lapidge, (Cambridge University Press, 1986), p. 93
      6.^ Sarah Foot, AEthelstan: The First King of England (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011), p. 192
      7.^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 919–966, Ed. & Trans. Steven Fanning, Bernard S. Bachrach (University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. 16
      8.^ Le Jan?; Vanderkindere.


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