Adeliza Countess of Aumale

Adeliza Countess of Aumale

Female 1029 - Bef 1090  (< 60 years)

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  • Name , Adeliza 
    Suffix Countess of Aumale 
    Born 1029 
    Gender Female 
    Died Bef 1090 
    Person ID I7417  GrangerMusgrave
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2016 

    Father Robert I ‘the Magnificent’ 6th Duc de Normandy,   b. 1003, Rouen France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jun 1035, Nicea Bithynia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years) 
    Mother de Falaise, Heleve Arlette,   b. 1003, Falaise Calvados France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1050  (Age 47 years) 
    Family ID F4850  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 de Boulogne, Lambert II Comte de Lens,   d. 1054 
    Married Abt 1053 
    Children 
     1. of Lens, Judith,   b. 1054, Lens, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1086  (Age 32 years)
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2016 10:52:12 
    Family ID F5330  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Odo II Comte de Champagne,   d. 1066 
    Married Abt 1060 
    Children 
     1. Stephen Count of Aumale,   b. Bef 1070,   d. Abt 1125  (Age > 55 years)
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2016 10:52:12 
    Family ID F5332  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Coats of Arms
    Armoiries_Comtes_Aumale
    Armoiries_Comtes_Aumale

  • Notes 
    • Adelaide of Normandy (or Adeliza) (c. 1030 - bef. 1090) was the sister of William the Conqueror and was Countess of Aumale in her own right.

      She was the daughter of Robert the Magnificent,[a] Duke of Normandy and born c.1030[1] Elisabeth Van Houts, in her article Les femmes dans l’histoire du duché de Normandie (or Women in the history of ducal Normandy) mentions Countess Adelaide as one of those notable Norman women who were known to have exerted a strong influence on their children especially with regard to passing on their own family history.[2]

      Adelaide's first marriage to Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu potentially gave then Duke William a powerful ally in upper Normandy.[3] But at the Council of Reims in 1049, when the marriage of Duke William with Matilda of Flanders was prohibited based on consanguinity, so were those of Eustace II, Count of Boulogne and Enguerrand of Ponthieu, who was already married to Adelaide.[4] Adelaide's marriage was apparently annulled c.1049/50 and another marriage was arranged for her, this time to Lambert II, Count of Lens, younger son of Eustace I, Count of Boulogne forming a new marital alliance between Normandy and Boulogne.[5] Lambert was killed in 1054 at Lille, aiding Baldwin V, Count of Flanders against Emperor Henry III.[6] Now widowed, Adelaide resided at Aumale, probably part of her dower from her first husband, Engurerand, or part of a settlement after the capture of Guy of Ponthieu, her brother-in-law.[b][5] As a dowager Adelaide began a semi-religious retirement and became involved with the church at Auchy presenting them with a number of gifts.[5] In 1060 she was called upon again to form another marital alliance, this time to a younger man Odo, Count of Champagne.[7] Odo seems to have been somewhat of a disappointment as he appears on only one of the Conqueror's charters and received no land in England; his wife being a tenant-in-chief in her own right.[7]

      In 1082 King William and Queen Matilda gave to the abbey of the Holy Trinity in Caen the town of Le Homme in the Cotentin with a provision to the Countess of Albamarla (Aumale), his sister, for a life tenancy.[8] In 1086, as Comitissa de Albatnarla,[8] as she was listed in the Domesday Book, was shown as having numerous holdings in both Suffolk and Essex,[9] one of the very few Norman noblewomen to have held lands in England at Domesday as a tenant-in-chief.[10] She was also given the lordship of Holderness which was held after her death by her 3rd husband, Odo, the by then disinherited Count of Champagne; the lordship then passed to their son, Stephen.[8] Adelaide died before 1090.[11]

      Adelaide married three times; first to Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu (died 1053)[12] by whom she had issue:

      Adelaide II, Countess of Aumale, m. William de Bréteuil, Lord of Bréteuil, son of William FitzOsbern, 1st Earl of Hereford.[8]

      She married secondly Lambert II, Count of Lens (died 1054),[11] they had a daughter:

      Judith of Lens, m. Waltheof Earl of Huntingdon and Northumbria.[13]

      Adelaide married thirdly in 1060 Odo II, Count of Champagne (d. aft. 1096),[14] by whom she had a son:

      Stephen, Count of Aumale.[14]


      References

      1.^ George Andrews Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III and Queen Philippa (Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Society, Salt Lake City, UT, 1985), p. 13
      2.^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'Les femmes dans l'histoire du duché de Normandie', Tabularia «««« Études »»»», n° 2, 2002, (10 July 2002), p. 24
      3.^ Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), pp. 69-70
      4.^ Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 68
      5.^ a b c Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 71
      6.^ John Carl Andressohn, The ancestry and life of Godfrey of Bouillon (Ayer Publishing, 1972) p. 20
      7.^ a b Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 72
      8.^ a b c d George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. I (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1910), p. 351
      9.^ Ann Williams, The English and the Norman Conquest (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, UK, 1995), p. 58, n. 57
      10.^ Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 76
      11.^ a b George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. I (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1910), p. 352
      12.^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. I (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1910), pp. 350-2
      13.^ N. J. Higham, The Kingdom of Northumbria, AD 350 - 1100 (Alan Sutton Publishing, Ltd. , 1993), p. 226
      14.^ a b Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band II (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1984), Tafel 46


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